Category Archives: Links

Changing Roles and Responsibilities of Museums

The past five years have been a busy time for museums- most notably in the image department.  Following a number of high profile controversies, a lot of people–audiences, and museum professionals alike–asked what role museums play in our society?  Here are a couple of recent articles dealing with this subject head on.

Why Museum Professionals Need to Talk About Black Panther

black panther
Killmonger in the Museum (Photo courtesy of article)

Last month saw the release of Marvel’s newest blockbuster, Black Panther.  Besides being a fantastic movie, this film offers a unique chance to open dialogues on a large scale about many topics- least of which are museums as mechanisms of colonialism.  This article discusses how and why museum professionals especially should look at their roles in this and the effects they have on the audiences we try to reach.  The piece ends by laying out suggestions for how museums can move forward incorporating and working towards more diverse and open dialogues between communities.

Two Museum Directors Say It’s Time to Tell the Unvarnished History of the U.S.

Ggover and Bunch
Gover and Bunch at Symposium (Photo courtesy of Smithsonian Magazine)

This article opens with the quote, “history matters because it has contemporary consequences,” and it just gets better from there.  Directors Kevin Gover (National Museum of the American Indian) and Lonnie Bunch (National Museum of African American History and Culture) participated in a day long symposium titled, “Mascots, Myths, Monuments and Memory,” in which they talked about confronting the historic and continued racist ideologies that are entrenched in contemporary American society and the role of museums.  They specifically discuss the example of the concurrent rise of confederate statues and racist mascots.

How the Dana Schultz Controversy- and a Year of Reckoning- Have Changed Museums Forever

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Election protest (photo courtesy of Quartz)

Chronicling a series of high profile controversies, this article looks at the combination of factors that have led to these, as well as the changes they are bringing to museums and their operation.  It also discusses why museums have become ground zero for explosive cultural encounters stating, “We’re in a time when these issues are real, these controversies are part of public space and public discourse, and museums are going to become the places where these issues get played out.”

Native Voices, Accurate History Forge Deeper, Better Understanding of American Indians in Nations Schools

NMAI education
Students using NK360 (photo courtesy of Smithsonian Insider)

This article showcases the role museums have within their respective walls and how they are branching out to have far reaching impacts in classrooms all over the nation.  Similar to classes taught at the Peabody by Curator of Education, Lindsay Randall, this article follows the creation and implementation of National Museum of the American Indian’s newest initiative, Native Knowledge 360. NK360 is a “long-term initiative to integrate the Native American experience into social studies, language arts and other curriculum in kindergarten through 12th-grade classrooms across the country.”   This program works with the inclusion and cooperation of Native communities and educators as well as provides educational materials for teachers.

 

 

A storage bay with a mixture of drawers and boxes

Updated Collections Online

The Peabody is excited to share our updated collections website!

Curious about the scholarly depth of the Peabody collections?  Looking for material from a particular site for your research?  Interested in simply browsing through the artifacts?

The site’s new and improved format is more user-friendly and provides easier access to our object records.  Enter a key word to search, browse a full list of sites, and click through random images of artifacts.

In addition to a streamlined interface, the updated website also includes information about the archival collections housed at the Peabody.  Temporary Archivist Irene Gates’s recent blog post  highlights the completion of the first step in processing our archives.  Or, explore the archival collections here.

While we do not yet have our full collection online, we add new records regularly – so come back often.  I hope that you enjoy exploring the Peabody’s collections as much as I do!

The Peabody Collection Online is made possible in part by a grant from the Abbot Academy Association, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring.

Girl Power! in the Archaeological Record

Contributed by Samantha Hixson

Follow these links to read some awesome stories of how women are helping unlock the secrets of the archaeological record.

Elite ‘Dynasty’ at Chaco Canyon Got It’s Power From One Woman, DNA Shows

Once again DNA analysis of sites is opening up our understanding of how societies operated historically.  By testing bone samples from Room 33 in Pueblo Bonito of Chaco Canyon, scientists were able to shed more light on the inner workings of power, class, wealth and status of ancestral Puebloans, and the major role women played within these.

New Discoveries from Cahokia’s ‘Beaded Burial’ May Rewrite Story of Ancient American City

Mound 72 of the Cahokia culture complex, when originally excavated in 1967, was thought to be a shining example of a burial of elite male warriors.  Fast forward almost 50 years and imagine archaeologist’s surprise when one third of the skeletons found were in fact female!  These findings call into question the idea that Cahokia was a male warrior-led patriarchy.

Grave of Disabled Young Woman Reveals Touching Tale of Care in Prehistoric Arizona

The excavation of young Hohokam woman’s grave is an example of what the excavators and author call the “Bioarchaeology of care.”  The young woman, who lived about 800 years ago had scoliosis, rickets, and tuberculosis. Through looking at this site, archaeologists are able learn more about the community in which the girl lived, and how they supported and cared for her, giving a decidedly human lens to a science that can sometimes become disconnected.